Monday, July 31, 2017

THE TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS - Hollis Godfrey - 1913


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___________________________________________________


JOURNAL OF POLITICAL ECONOMY, 1913  - Paper

THE TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS 


Modified Excerpts from the paper

Little by little, as the engineering student goes forward in education and practice,  he begins to see that the possession of certain powers enables him to conquer hesitant men and recalcitrant machines,
and also problems which involve both men and machines simultaneously. And the powers which enable him to do these things are science and engineering (convertising science into useful devices and processes). His thinking helps him in this.

I assume that no course in the industrial engineering steam would be begun before the end of the Sophomore year in college. The man who reaches the Junior year of college or technical school
must have had some training in science and mathematics or he would not be eligible to enter the industrial engineering course. He must have acquired some common-sense and scientific attitude
on his way, and the knowledge of science and common-sense so gained should be sufficient to enable him to recognize that in electing scientific management he is deliberately electing to follow a long and arduous road. The problem before us, then, when we discuss the work of men electing industrial engineering courses, is taking men with some common-sense and some knowledge of science and raising what they have to the highest possible power.

How, then, can the industrial engineer become a scientist, attain the scientific attitude of mind ?

By welding the scientific work of the classroom with the shop-work of the factory; by making the laboratory hours, hours that are spent with wage-earners striving for their daily wage. Laboratory and classroom hours alike must be filled with reality rather than with pure theory or with theory quite unrelated to the practical world.

The student must first of all, get in touch with the shop. And I insist that he can do that nowhere save in actual operating shops among men who are working for their daily wage. No shop practice in the school will produce a like result. Shop-sense is one of the most valuable possessions of the industrial
engineer. That sense comes only through actual shop practice. Once possessed it means that the man has thereafter the freedom of the shop.

To attain the desirable ends of knowledge of science and posses-sion of common-sense I propose that any course in the science of management shall consist of classroom work as outlined below and
of laboratory work carried on in actual operating shops. That means that manufacturers who are broad-minded enough to be willing to assist the college, and instructors broad-minded enough
to recognize the limitations of industry must co-operate in giving the laboratory instruction in shop practice to the students. I believe both groups of men exist and I feel that through their combined efforts the student should have an opportunity to spend the summers of his Sophomore and Junior years in actual shop practice, while three afternoons a week during the scholastic year should see him working in the shop.

What underlying thought must be before the men who make the courses ?

The industrial engineer is dealing in all cases with both men and machines. He must study "man" in his relation to his industrial environ-ment — not any single class of men, but all the men engaged in
industry. He must study "machines," not alone in their relation to their product, but also in relation to the human beings who operate them. It is his task to bring the best that modern science has to the aid and well-being of man.

It is in the development of his pupil's studies of men that the wise teacher of scientific management will work most steadfastly in correlating the allied courses, mentioned later, in psychology
and physiology, in economics and sociology, with the courses in the science of management, and with the work of living men and whir-ring machines.

The industrial engineer must recognize the presence of many factors in a problem. He must solve equations of not only two unknown quantities, but of a dozen unknown quantities, so to speak. And
the correlation of his courses in class with each other and with life will do much in the way of enabling him to do so.



When should the work begin, and how much of the student's time should it occupy ?

Direct work in industrial engineering and scientific management should begin either at the
end of two years or of four years in college. The direct and allied special classroom courses should occupy one full year of collegiate training, divided between two years' work, making a half-year's
work in scientific management during both the Junior and Senior years. The shopwork should occupy two summer vacations and three afternoons a week during each of the two years.

What courses should be offered ?

A dominant course in the science of management running through two years, allied with courses in economics, sociology, psychology, physiology, hygiene and sanitation, theory and practice
of accounting. All these should be in addition to the student's more direct work in science, mathematics, engineering, English, and foreign languages, which occupy the time of three out of the four collegiate years — if the courses are made undergraduate ones.

What should be the content of the scientific management courses given during the four half-years that comprise the Junior and Senior years of most colleges and technical schools ?

The first half-year should be devoted to a general view of four picked industries — in order that the student may see industry more or less as a whole — and to the study of the principles of
scientific management. The laboratory work for this course should consist of the broad outlined study of four plants from the time of the receipt of the first inquiry from the prospective customer to the final entry of the payment for the bill and the calculation of the cost. The classroom work for this course should be devoted to a thorough grounding in the basic principles of organization,
and to study of the principles of scientific management.

It is most essential that the student should obtain at the very start a clear realization of the difference between system and science. It is most essential also that he should come to understand that,
while certain problems solved for one industry may be solved for all industry, such general solutions cannot be presumed upon. He should know that every new business will contain new problems,
which must be solved by the use of all the knowledge of the past plus all the imaginative genius he can hope to possess. That is to say, the student must learn that a mechanism used successfully
in one place cannot be bodily transported to another with hope of instant success. By the end of the first half-year each individual taking the course should have come to realize that he is studying
the principles of a science which are applicable to every case, not memorizing a set of rules or inheriting a stock of recipes. The study of four actual operating plants will aid him greatly in this
realization.

The second half-year should be devoted in the classroom to a detailed study of the planning-room and the processes involved in getting work into the shop, of stores, routing, specifications, etc. —
planning in general, in a word. The laboratory work should consist of actual planning-room experience in the shop.

It is entirely true that there is a question as to whether planning-room experience should follow or precede shop training. It may, therefore, be a question whether planning should be put in this
course. It is my own belief that the student will master his shop theory better the third half-year from the fact that he has discovered the basic reasons of the work in the planning-room. It should be
noted, moreover, in this connection that I have assumed that the student has had a summer's experience in actual shop practice as a prerequisite of the course, and that he has had a half year of
general preliminary study.

The third half-year should be devoted to a detailed study of work in the shop (especially of the teaching work of the functional foreman), of inspection, and of task work. All of this except the
study of task work should be done in actual plants. The task work should be done on fellow-students in the shops of the school. No untrained man should ever be put on actual task-setting.

The third half-year offers a great opportunity to impress upon the student the importance of the teaching function of his work. The whole theory of functional foremanship is a theory of educa-
tion and a great part of the time of an industrial engineer must be spent in teaching the men with whom he is working. Adequate powers of expression are by no means common among our recent
graduates. The teacher of scientific management can never forget that the work of his pupils must show in the life-work of the men with whom they are dealing. The bridge-builder leaves a physical
monument largely untouched by the later thought of men. The industrial builder must educate in such a way that his work will go progressively forward in the minds of men. That is true education,
and education is true only when it obtains adequate expression.

The fourth half-year should be devoted to studies in bringing all the best that science offers to the aid of industry — to work in costs, to work in the determining of policies by studies of sales,
purchasing, and the like, and to the co-ordination of the work of the three half-years already outlined.

The course of the fourth half-year should be broad enough to give the student some concept that great movements of trade exist and that they are factors which he must meet and use. The world
is fairly well provided with men who can look after a few details.

It is very poorly provided with men who can care for great constructive work. One of the greatest industrial leaders of our time said to me the other day: "The greater the affairs of a corporation, the
smaller the number of men who can deal with them. It seems to be a true inverse proportion. There are ten men who can think in a hundred thousand dollars, to one who can think in a million,
and ten who can think in a million to one who can think in ten millions."

I should hardly expect any course to give an undergraduate a great grasp of comprehensive plans. There is, however, no reason why we should hitch our wagon to the lowest of the stars when we
can find higher ones within our reach.

In the foregoing resume of a course in the science of management I have made no reference to many subjects I should have been glad to consider, to reports and theses, to methods and policies. Considerations of brevity forbade. I must turn again to my catechism and end with three brief questions and three brief answers.

What should the allied courses teach ?

The relation of man to industry and to his general environment.

What should the college courses in English teach ?

The power of expression.

What should the work in scientific management teach ?

That scientific management is a change of mental attitude (mental attitude, now, as always, the most powerful force among men) which makes employer and employee pull together instead of apart, which brings all that is best in science to the aid of every man in industry, and which, by its substitution of exact knowledge for the chaos of guess work and ignorance, makes progressively for
justice and for the coming of the "new industrial day."

Hollis Godfrey

West Medford, Mass.


I am happy I covered some these issues in my principles of industrial engineering.
Principles of Industrial Engineering

Video Presentation
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A SYMPOSIUM ON SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT AND EFFICIENCY IN COLLEGE


ADMINISTRATION

COMPRISING AMONG OTHERS

THE PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE EFFICIENCY SESSION

OF THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE

SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF ENGINEERING

EDUCATION, HELD AT BOSTON, MASS.,

JUNE 26-29, 1912


OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY ITHACA, N. Y.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.


INTRODUCTION. " Frank. B. Gilbreth


EDUCATIONAL DEMANDS OF MODERN PROGRESS. " Harrington Emerson. 



PRACTICE VERSUS THEORY IN THE SCIENCE OP MANAGEMENT. " F. A. Parklmrst


32 32 37

EDUCATION AND EFFICIENT LIVING. " Meyer Bloomfield

THE ENGINEER AS A MANAGER. " H. L. Gantt


THE MEN WHO SUCCEED IN SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT. " H. K. Hathaway

THE PLACE OF THE COLLEGE IN COLLECTING AND CONSERVING THE DATA OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT. " Wilfred Lewis

AN AUXILIARY TO COLLEGES IN THE TRAINING OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGERS." E. T. Kent

TEACHING SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT IN ENGINEERING SCHOOLS." R. B. Wolf

THE TEACHING OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT IN ENGINEERING SCHOOLS." Hollis Godfrey 


TEACHING THE PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT. " 

Walter Rautenstrauch

82 TEACHING SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT IN THE TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

H. F. J. Porter 94

A BROADENED VIEW OF EFFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING INSTRUCTION.

L. J. Johnson 108

ABSENCES FROM CLASSES ONE MEASURE OF INEFFICIENCY."
F. P.McKibben

112 118

THE PROBLEM OF EFFICIENCY IN TEACHING. " W. A. Hillebrand ....


THE ADMINISTRATION OF COLLEGE SHOP LABORATORIES. " W. F. M. Goss

129 133 139 145

SETTING TASKS FOR COLLEGE MEN. " S. E. Thompson

DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATION AND EFFICIENCY. " Hugo Diemer

ACADEMIC EFFICIENCY." William Kent

OPERATING ENGINEERING SCHOOLS UNDER SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT. " H. Wade Hibbard

161 182

EFFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION. " G. H. Shepard

THE APPLICATION OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT TO THE OPERATION

OF COLLEGES. " S. E. Whitaker

205 217

SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT IN THE COLLEGES. " E. F. Palmer iii





http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/A_Symposium_on_Scientific_Management_and_Efficiency_in_College_1000331586/1

updated  18 June 2017, 15 August 2015

Friday, June 30, 2017

Modern Engineering and Modern Shop Management - F.W. Taylor

There is a close analogy between the methods of modern engineering and this type of management. Engineering now centers in the drafting room as modern management does in the planning department. The new style engineering has all the appearance of complication and extravagance, with its multitude of drawings; the amount of study and work which is put into each detail; and its corps of draftsmen, all of whom would be sneered at by the old engineer as "non-producers." For the same reason, modern management, with its minute time study and a managing department in which each operation is carefully planned, with its many written orders and its apparent red tape, looks like a waste of money; while the ordinary management in which the planning is mainly done by the workmen themselves, with the help of one or two foremen, seems simple and economical in the extreme.

The writer, however, while still a young man, had all lingering doubt as to the value of a drafting room dispelled by seeing the chief engineer, the foreman of the machine shop, the foreman of the foundry, and one or two workmen, in one of our large and successful engineering establishments of the old school, stand over the cylinder of an engine which was being built, with chalk and dividers, and discuss for more than an hour the proper size and location of the studs for fastening on the cylinder head. This was simplicity, but not economy. About the same time he became thoroughly convinced of the necessity and economy of a planning department with time study, and with written instruction cards and returns. He saw over and over again a workman shut down his machine and hunt up the foreman to inquire, perhaps, what work to put into his machine next, and then chase around the shop to find it or to have a special tool or template looked up or made. He saw workmen carefully nursing their jobs by the hour and doing next to nothing to avoid making a record, and he was even more forcibly convinced of the necessity for a change while he was still working as a machinist by being ordered by the other men to slow down to half speed under penalty of being thrown over the fence.

No one now doubts the economy of the drafting room, and the writer predicts that in a very few years from now no one will doubt the economy and necessity of the study of unit times and of the planning department.

Another point of analogy between modern engineering and modern management lies in the fact that modern engineering proceeds with comparative certainty to the design and construction of a machine or structure of the maximum efficiency with the minimum weight and cost of materials, while the old style engineering at best only approximated these results and then only after a series of breakdowns, involving the practical reconstruction of the machine and the lapse of a long period of time. The ordinary system of management, owing to the lack of exact information and precise methods, can only approximate to the desired standard of high wages accompanied by low labor cost and then only
slowly, with marked irregularity in results, with continued opposition, and, in many cases, with danger from strikes. Modern management, on the other hand, proceeds slowly at first, but with directness and precision, step by step, and, after the first few object lessons, almost without opposition on the part of the men, to high wages and low labor cost; and as is of great importance, it assigns wages to the men which are uniformly fair. They are not demoralized, and their sense of justice offended by receiving wages which are sometimes too low and at other times entirely too high.

One of the marked advantages of scientific management lies in its freedom from strikes. The writer has never been opposed by a strike, although he has been engaged for a great part of his time since 1883 in introducing this type of management in different parts of the country and in a great variety of industries. The only case of which the writer can think in which a strike under this system might be unavoidable would be that in which most of the employees were members of a labor union, and of a union whose rules were so inflexible and whose members were so stubborn that they were unwilling to try any other system, even though it assured them larger wages than their own. The writer has seen,
however, several times after the introduction of this system, the members of labor unions who were working under it leave the union in large numbers because they found that they could do better under the operation of the system than under the laws of the union.

There is no question that the average individual accomplishes the most when he either gives himself, or some one else assigns him, a definite task, namely, a given amount of work which he must do within a given time; and the more elementary the mind and character of the individual the more necessary does it become that each task shall extend over a short period of time only. No school teacher would think of telling children in a general way to study a certain book or subject. It is practically universal to assign each day a definite lesson beginning on one specified page and line and ending on another; and the best progress is made when the conditions are such that a definite study hour or period can be assigned in. which the lesson must be learned. Most of us remain, through a great part of our lives, in this respect, grown-up children, and do our best only under pressure of a task of comparatively short duration. Another and perhaps equally great advantage of assigning a daily task as against ordinary piece work lies in the fact that the success of a good workman or the failure of a poor one is thereby daily and prominently called to the attention of the management. Many a poor workman might be willing to go along in a slipshod way under ordinary piece work, careless as to whether he fell off a little in his output or not. Very few of them, however, would be willing to record a daily failure to accomplish their task even if they were allowed to do so by their foreman; and also since on ordinary piece work the price alone is specified without limiting the time which the job is to take, a quite large falling off in output can in many cases occur without coming to
the attention of the management at all. It is for these reasons that the writer has above indicated "a large daily task" for each man as the first of four principles which should be included in the best type of management.

It is evident, however, that it is useless to assign a task unless at the same time adequate measures are taken to enforce its accomplishment.  It is to compel the completion of the daily task then that two of the other principles are required, namely, "high pay for success" and "loss in case of failure." The advantage of Mr. H. L. Gantt's system of "task work with a bonus," and the writer's "differential rate piece work" over the other systems lies in the fact that with each of these the men automatically and daily receive either an extra reward in case of complete success, or a distinct loss in case they fall off even a little.

The four principles above referred to can be successfully applied either under day work, piece work, task work with a bonus, or differential rate piece work, and each of these systems has its own especial conditions under which it is to be preferred to either of the other three. In no case, however, should an attempt be made to apply these principles unless accurate and thorough time study has previously been made of every item entering into the day's task.

They should be applied under day work only when a number of miscellaneous jobs have to be done day after day, none of which can occupy the entire time of a man throughout the whole of a day and when the time required to do each of these small jobs is likely to vary somewhat each day. In this case a number of these jobs can be grouped into a daily task which should be assigned, if practicable, to one man, possibly even to two or three, but rarely to a gang of men of any size. To illustrate: In a small boiler house in which there is no storage room for coal, the work of wheeling the coal to the fireman, wheeling out the ashes, helping clean fires and keeping the boiler room and the outside of the boilers clean can be made into the daily task for a man, and if these items do not sum up into a full day's work, on the average, other duties can be added until a proper task is assured. Or, the various details of sweeping, cleaning, and keeping a certain section of a shop floor windows, machines, etc., in order can be united to form a task. Or, in a small factory which turns out a uniform product and in uniform quantities day after day, supplying raw materials to certain parts of the factory and removing finished product from others may be coupled with other definite duties to form a task. The task should call for a large day's work, and the man should be paid more than the usual day's pay so that the position will be sought for by first-class, ambitious men. Clerical work can very properly be done by the task in this way, although when there is enough of it, piece work at so much per entry is to be preferred.

In all cases a clear cut, definite inspection of the task is desirable at least once a day and sometimes twice. When a shop is not running at night, a good time for this inspection is at seven o'clock in the morning, for instance. The inspector should daily sign a printed card, stating that he has inspected the work done by ----, and enumerating the various items of the task. The card should state that the workman has satisfactorily performed his task, "except the following items," which should be enumerated in detail.

F.W. Taylor - Shop Management


Updated  18 June 2017, 27 May 2017

Hollis Godfrey in his 1913 article THE TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS specifically mentions training for industrial engineers in the planning department.

June - Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan











Industrial Engineering - Introduction to  Basic Principles and Techniques


June First Week, 1 to 5 - 2016

Principles of Industrial Engineering - Taylor - Narayana Rao
______________________

______________________

Industrial Engineering Introduction
Component Areas of IE: Human Effort engineering and System Efficiency Engineering



Pioneering Efforts of Taylor, Gilbreth and Emerson
Principles of Motion Economy


Motion Study - Human Effort Engineering
Ergonomics - Introduction



Work Measurement
Predetermined Motion Time Systems (PMTS)


Methods Efficiency Engineering
Product Design Efficiency Engineering

June 2 Week, 8 to 12

Plant Layout - Efficiency
Value Engineering - Introduction



Statistical Quality Control – Industrial Engineering
Inspection Methods Efficiency Engineering


Operations Research - An Efficiency Improvement Tool for Industrial Engineers
Engineering Economics is an Efficiency Improvement Tool for Industrial Engineers



Industrial Engineering and Scientific Management in Japan
Shigeo Shingo - The Japanese Industrial Engineer


System Engineering Process and Its Management
Systems Improvement Process


June 3 week, 15 to 19

Systems Installation - Installing Proposed Methods
Productivity, Safety, Comfort, and Operator Health Management



Organizing for Industrial Engineering: Historical Evolution of Thinking
Current Research in IE



Managing Change in Improvement Projects - Comfort Zone to Comfort Zone
Supply Chain Cost Reduction


Total Improvement Management
Total Industrial Engineering - H. Yamashina



Industrial Engineering Economics - Important Component of Industrial Engineering
Time Value of Money - Time Value of Money Calculations

June 22 to 26



Cash Flow Estimation for Expenditure Proposals - Depreciation and Other Related Issues
Required Rate of Return - Cost of Capital  - Required Rate of Return for Investment or Expenditure Proposal..



NPV - IRR and Other Summary Project Assessment Measures
Income Expansion Projects - Cost Reduction Projects - Replacement Decisons


Present-Worth Comparisons
Rate-of-Return Calculations


Equivalent Annual-Worth Comparisons
Expected Values and Risk of Project Revenues and Costs


Structural Analysis of Alternatives
Engineering Economic Analysis - Subject Update - Recent Case Studies


June Month Birthdays - Management Scholars and Professors



IE Techniques to be Revised

Principles of Industrial Engineering/Scientific Management by Taylor
Twelve Principles of Efficiency - Harrington Emerson
Product Design Efficiency Engineering (Value Engineering) - Application of Engineering Technology
Methods Efficiency Engineering - Operation Analysis (Maynard) - Application of Engineering Technology
    Plant Layout - Material and Man Movement Analysis and Optimization
    Innovations in Industrial Engineering by Shigeo Shingo - SMED and Poka Yoke
Operations Research - Application of Mathematical Modelling and Optimization in Technology Processes (Product and Process), Business Processes and Managerial Processes.
Application of Statistics in Industrial Engineering - Six Sigma, SPC, SPC, Forecasting
Engineering Economics - Economic Analysis of Engineering Projects - Income Enhancing Projects as well as Cost Reduction Projects - It evaluates and improves capital productivity both long term as well as short term
Human Effort Engineering - Motion study - Principles of Motion Economy, Motion Study
Ergonomics - Application of knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and bio mechanics and findings of experiments on actual working situations

Work Measurement - Productivity Measurement - Cost Measurement

Productivity Management 

High Efficiency/Productivity Systems  Industrial Engineering- Lean Systems Industrial Engineering - Toyota Production System










One Year Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan

January - February - March - April - May - June

July - August - September - October - November - December

In months after June the articles prescribed have to be modified as a new scheme is started in 2015.


Industrial Engineering - Introduction to  Basic Principles and Techniques - June (28 article are included so far)

Scientific Management of Taylor  (July 17 articles)

12 Principles of Efficiency by Harrington Emerson

Motion Study

Operation Analysis - Method Study - Methods Efficiency Engineering (August 25 articles)

Work Measurement 

Value Engineering

Ergonomics

Mathematics and Optimization

Application of Statistics for Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement

Engineering Economics

Business Process Improvement

Management Process Improvement

Productivity Management and Improvement (20 articles)

Lean Systems (December 20 articles)



Updated  4 June 2017, 29 May 2016, 26 May 2016, 16 Feb 2016






Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Fortune 41 to 50 Companies - Industrial Engineering Departments - Activity



RANK   COMPANY  
REVENUES ($M)





41 Dell Technologies

$64,806

Michael Palmer
M & A Integration Senior Director, Industrial Engineering @ Dell P.E. PMP CPE
Dell Technologies   Georgia Institute of Technology
Austin, Texas

Senior Manufacturing Engineering Manager
Company NameDell
Dates Employed1997 – 2004  Employment Duration7 yrs
LocationGlobal
Led Dell’s Global Engineering team responsible for increasing manufacturing, logistics capacity >300% with a >50% reduction in operational costs helping maximize profitability during Dell Inc. high growth period 1998-2006
Led the Laptop and Consumer Desktop Process engineering organization in designing, implementing and operating Manufacturing and IT processes and operations for Dell's businesses in support of "hyper growth" period. Led global teams in defining strategy to support rapid growth and even more rapid improvements in manufacturing productivity and cost using continuous flow, lean, customer focused success, and TQM principles.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelepalmer/

42 MetLife
$63,476

43Aetna
$63,155

44 PepsiCo

$62,799


Jim Boucher
Vice President, PAB Supply Chain, Commercialization & Integration at PepsiCo
PepsiCo   Purdue University
Chicago, Illinois

Manager, Production Services
PepsiCo
Dates EmployedJul 1990 – May 1993  Employment Duration2 yrs 11 mos
LocationGreater Chicago Area
Leadership or Planning, capacity and inventory management, co-pack planning, warehouse operations, procurement, and transportation management.
 PepsiCo
Manager, Industrial Engineering - Quaker Oats
PepsiCo
Dates EmployedJun 1988 – Jun 1990  Employment Duration2 yrs 1 mo
LocationKansas City, Missouri Area
Lead facility cost management process, new product costing and variable standard development.
 PepsiCo

Senior Industrial Engineer - Quaker
PepsiCo
Dates EmployedJun 1987 – Jun 1988  Employment Duration1 yr 1 mo
CMP and financial variance analysis, coordinate new product costing and variable standard development.
 PepsiCo
Industrial Engineer - Quaker
Company NamePepsiCo
Dates EmployedJan 1986 – May 1987  Employment Duration1 yr 5 mos
LocationCedar Rapids, Iowa Area
Lead RTE, Shipping and Milling CMP efforts, new product costing and variable standard development.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jim-boucher-b8025889/

45 Archer Daniels Midland
$62,346

46 UPS
$60,906

47 Intel
$59,387

48 Prudential Financial
$58,779

49 Albertsons Cos.
$58,734

50 United Technologies
$57,244

Fortune 31 to 40 Companies - Industrial Engineering Departments - Activity



All engineering companies must have industrial engineering departments

RANK   COMPANY  
REVENUES ($M)




31  Comcast
$80,403


32   IBM
$79,919

Jordan Susskind
Industrial Engineer
IBM   Northwestern University
New York, New York
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordan-susskind-b8087694/

33
State Farm Insurance Cos.
$76,132

34  Phillips 66
$72,396

35  Johnson & Johnson
$71,890

36 Procter & Gamble

$71,726


ENGINEERING
Engineering at P&G is a well-oiled machine. Day after day, we’re innovating new products and driving cost-efficient solutions. Here, you’ll play a part in designing all the bells and whistles (and expert technology) to make our multimillion-dollar machines, plants and work processes that make our products. You’ll improve the capability, safety and productivity of all our systems, while reducing costs for our business. From Process or Automation Engineer to Manufacturing and more, you’ll be at the center of building some of the world’s best brands. Ready to get started?

http://pgcareers.com/career-areas-find-your-fit/engineering/



37 Valero Energy
$70,166

38 Target
$69,495

39 Freddie Mac
$65,665

40 Lowe’s
$65,017

Fortune 21 to 30 Companies - Industrial Engineering Departments - Activity



RANK   COMPANY    REVENUES ($M)



21  J.P. Morgan Chase
$105,486


22  Express Scripts Holding
$100,288


23  Home Depot
$94,595


24  Boeing

$94,571

Mimi Truong
Industrial Engineer
Boeing   University of Washington
Everett, Washington
https://www.linkedin.com/in/mimi-truong-ab10a376/

Carla Mejias
Industrial Engineer at Boeing
Boeing   University of Central Florida
Charleston, South Carolina
https://www.linkedin.com/in/carla-mejias-03644b88/

Jonathan Wright
Industrial Engineer at Boeing
Boeing   Villanova University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-wright-29a42726/


25Wells Fargo
$94,176


26Bank of America Corp.
$93,662


27Alphabet
$90,272


28Microsoft
$85,320


29  Anthem
$84,863


30Citigroup
$82,386

Fortune 11 to 20 Companies - Industrial Engineering Departments - Activity



RANK   COMPANY  
REVENUES ($M)

11     AmerisourceBergen
$146,850

12    Amazon.com

$135,987

Alan Sheaffer
Industrial Engineering Management
Amazon   Penn State University
Greater Los Angeles Area

Experience
 Amazon
Senior Worldwide Innovation & Design Engineer

Aug 2016 – Present
Greater Seattle Area

https://www.linkedin.com/in/alansheaffer/


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Sr. Industrial Engineer
Location Seattle, WA, US
Seniority Level
Mid-Senior level



Job Description
Do you want to be part of an organization that is on the leading edge for operations, supply chain, and fulfillment design? The Amazon Fresh operations team is looking for a proven technical leader with extensive experience designing physical buildings and implementing process improvement projects within the fulfillment and distribution industry. As the Sr. Industrial Engineer, you will work with broad set of stakeholders including operations, engineering, capacity planning and retail to design and develop the next generation Fresh & Pantry FC, while challenging the status quo of existing operations. This position requires a firm understanding of engineering systems, forecasting, cost estimating and process flows in order to successfully complete the design cycle.

In this role, you will have the opportunity to display your skills in the following areas:
Develop a detailed schedule for managing the end-to-end engineering design process.
Engage with vendors to define engineering requirements and procure budgetary quotes.
Create a detailed capital approval plan for new fulfillment centers and use this plan to obtain funding for launching a new fulfillment operation.
Work with stakeholders to build a cross-functional team to execute the operational launch of a new site.
Develop innovative design concepts to improve throughput and labor in Fresh & Pantry FC’s.
Scope and implement next generation automation solutions for Fresh & Pantry FCs.

Our Sr. Industrial Engineers work across the organization to find solutions to complex problems and are expected to innovate on behalf of our customers to ensure these solutions provide a flawless experience. In order to accomplish this, a Sr Industrial Engineer must think strategically and make data driven decisions. You will be driving efforts, both independently and as part of larger project teams and you’ll have a significant impact on this growing business. Successful candidates will be strong leaders who can prioritize well, communicate clearly and have a consistent track record of delivering results. You must have the experience and capability to create and present documentation for senior executives and align your roadmap with Amazon’s strategic objectives. Excellent written and verbal communication skills are essential. You should be experienced in working with data to analyze root causes, implementing long term solutions and leading teams with advanced analytical, mathematical, and quantitative capabilities.


Basic Qualifications

BA or BS in Industrial Engineering, or equivalent technical field from an accredited university
7+ years in Operations, Design, Engineering or capital project management for a Grocery or Food Service Distribution firm
Demonstrated ability to own projects, think big and influence across all levels of an organization
Excellent communication skills, ability to simplify complex topics for broad audiences
Willingness to travel up to 30%


Preferred Qualifications
MBA or Master’s Degree in a related field
Design experience in the grocery industry, with an emphasis on chilled and frozen facility design.
Operations or Industrial Engineering experience in a grocery fulfillment operation
Alternatively, 5+ years’ experience in Material Handling solutions

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/284109416/

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