Sunday, December 31, 2017

Product Productivity Engineering



22 December 2017

Product Productivity Engineering - Definition and Explanation


Developing and Designing products that promise higher productivity in processes at the user end is product productivity engineering.  (Narayana Rao K.V.S.S., 22 December 2017)
(IISE Linkedin Group Topic:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/75670/75670-6349880422469603328)


Examples of High Productivity Equipment and Machines


CNC Lathe for High-Productivity Vertical Turning of Flange-Type Workpieces


Extreme rigidity, high rapid traverse speeds and short strokes, together with the integral coolant system, guarantee precision, high productivity levels and short idle times for the VSC 250 production machine.
http://www.emag.com/machines/turning-machines/production-vsc/vsc-250.html

Okuma’s new 2SP-2500H CNC lathe featuring smart machine productivity

24 October, 2017
Okuma has launched the 2SP-2500H two-spindle CNC lathe, with innovative front-facing twin spindles to provide much higher levels of productivity and far greater reliability, for auto parts and other mass production applications. The 2SP-2500H is an automation-ready machine that integrates two lathes into one unit with a standard loader that feeds blanks for continuous front and back work.
https://www.cnctimes.com/editorial/okumas-new-2sp-2500h-cnc-lathe-featuring-smart-machine-productivity


In industrial engineering, product productivity engineering has to develop as an area of practice. Industrial engineers focus on increasing the productivity of processes and in that process identify improvements in machines and equipment that increase the productivity of the process under evaluation. This knowledge can be used in the development and design stages of machines and equipment. Hence within the industrial engineering profession, product productivity engineers and process productivity engineers can interact and exchange ideas and take up new development and design projects to create machines and equipment that provide higher productivity.


More Examples of High Productivity Equipment and Machines


Innovative, High Productivity Fiber Laser Tube Cutting

TruLaser Tube 5000 fiber laser tube cutting machine from TRUMPF is the world’s first tube cutting machine with a solid-state laser to eliminate the need for a fully enclosed housing, making it quick and easy to load individual tubes and profiles or to remove finished parts while the machine is in operation.
December 30, 2017
http://www.fabricatingandmetalworking.com/2017/12/innovative-high-productivity-fiber-laser-tube-cutting/

The W 250 from Wirtgen: world class in performance and productivity

The strength of the W 250 lies in its ability to mill large job sites on motorways or airports at top speed. The Wirtgen large milling machine can remove asphalt layers with a milling depth of up to 350 mm and hard concrete surfaces at a high advance rate. In addition to removing complete roadway sections in a single pass, individual layers can also be removed extremely economically.
https://www.wirtgen.de/en/news-media/press-releases/article_detail.2567.php

CNC LATHE M06D-II/M08D-II

High rigidity and high productivity turning machine Milling series
Overwhelming cost performance
http://www.tsugami.co.jp/eng/product/lathe/post1299/

HyperSync™ - eIMC™ in-mold closing technology – up to 20% improvement in productivity
2016


All-new high-performance, fully integrated system for specialty closure manufacturing -The HyperSync™

HyperSync™ uses the revolutionary new eIMC™ in-mold closing technology. This servo-driven technology allows for the safe overlapping of mold functions, providing precise, controlled closing of flip-top closures while still in the warm position. The speed of closing is carefully controlled, allowing for quick closing movements with precision; this ensures the fastest closing speed while maintaining the ideal force required and ensuring optimal part quality. The use of eIMC™ in-mold closing technology provides up to 20% increase in productivity, with nearly two seconds saved per cycle depending on the application.
http://www.husky.co/News.aspx?id=6442451075


High Productivity Machines - Marketing Advantage


High productivity machines have  marketing advantages. They are rationally desirable and hence demand exists for high productivity machines. There is also the communication advantage. You can advertise high productivity machines, get immediate sales and also create brand value. Your company will be associated with innovativeness and high productivity. Whenever, machines are being replaced buyers look at your catalogues and include your company in the product request notifications.





22 December - National Mathematics Day - India

http://nraonid.blogspot.com/2012/12/22-december-national-mathematics-day.html


Updated  31 December 2017,  25 December 2017, 23 December 2017, 22 December 2017
First published on 22 December 2017

December - Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan



BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 2018

Remember The Best Events of 2017 and Feel Happy. Feel Good About Past and Hope will Appear for the Future



Positive events provide energy to do good.

Positive thoughts beget positive resolve, positive resolve takes you forward towards auspicious results - Prime Minister Narendra Modi

#PositiveIndia  Positive India -  Bulletin Board

http://guide-india.blogspot.com/2017/12/positiveindia-bulletin-board.html


Top 10 Blogs on Industrial Engineering


Applied Industrial Engineering

IE in New Technologies - IE with New Technologies


Implementation of  Industrial Engineering Principles and Techninques in New Technologies (Engineering Processes) and Business Processes

1. Additive Manufacturing Productivity


Assembly Design Framework for Additive Manufacturing Based on Axiomatic Design Concept
https://www.xcdsystem.com/iise/abstract/File7673/UploadFinalPaper_2655.pdf
Yosep Oh, University at Buffalo; Sara Behdad, University at Buffalo, SUNY

Abstract:

AM productivity

According to the design for assembly (DFA) concept, design features should be integrated into a few physical parts to reduce design complexity.  However, building up a single product can have some negative effects on the AM productivity by increasing buildup time and cost. In this paper, a design framework using the assembly concept is proposed with the aim of letting the AM productivity reach an allowable level. The design framework is developed based on an Axiomatic Design (AD) approach, where AM productivity elements including buildup time, assembly time and the amount of support are considered as non-functional requirements (nFRs). The AM productivity is assessed by the Information Axiom to choose the best design. The proposed design framework can help engineers design and evaluate AM products.

Interesting references cited in the paper

* Thomas, D.S. and Gilbert, S.W., 2014, Costs and Cost Effectiveness of Additive Manufacturing - A Literature Review and Discussion, NIST.
* Oh, Y. and Behdad, S., 2016, Assembly Based Part Design to Improve the Additive Manufacturing
Productivity: Process Time, Cost and Surface Roughness, ASME IDETC, Charlotte, NC, USA.
* Zhang, Y., Bernard, A., Gupta, R.K. and Harik, R., 2014, Evaluating the Design for Additive Manufacturing: A
Process Planning Perspective, Procedia CIRP, 21, 144–150.
* Thompson, M.K., 2013, Improving the Requirements Process in Axiomatic Design Theory, CIRP Annals - Manufacturing Technology, 62, 115–118.


2. Biomanufacturing (Biotechnology) Productivity

Productivity in Biomanufacturing

Researchers are examining the possibility of taking  advantage of the natural differences in productivity among cells that are used in biomanufacturing. They foster mutations to create genetic variability and then use microchips to analyze the behavior of individual cells, choosing the most prolific for larger-scale production.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/424695/why-is-biomanufacturing-so-hard/


3. Productivity and Nanotech

Productive Nanotech Systems
https://www.foresight.org/roadmaps/Nanotech_Roadmap_2007_main.pdf

Related

OSRAM Boosts LED Chip Productivity With Nanotechnology
Aug 27, 2014
https://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news/newsid=37099.php

4. Electric Batteries and Productivity Applications

Nano One Enhances Pilot Productivity and Files a New Patent

Vancouver B.C. Dr. Stephen Campbell, Principal Scientist at Nano One Materials, today announced that Nano One has filed a patent related to yield improvements in its process for the manufacture of lithium metal oxide cathode materials for use in advanced lithium ion batteries.
August 2017

https://nanoone.ca/nano-one-enhances-pilot-productivity-files-new-patent/


5. IoT and Productivity

McKinsey Global Institute Report
THE INTERNET OF THINGS: MAPPING THE VALUE BEYOND THE HYPE
JUNE 2015
You can donwload the report from the web
(Link)


How the Internet of Things will reshape future production systems
By Vineet Gupta and Rainer Ulrich
September 2017
https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/operations/our-insights/how-the-internet-of-things-will-reshape-future-production-systems


6. New Technology and Equipment for Productivity

PONSSE INTRODUCES NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTIVITY AND ERGONOMICS
Virtual reality (VR) training simulator.
http://www.ponsse.com/fr/media-archive/nouvelles/ponsse-introduces-new-technology-for-productivity-and-ergonomics

How Does Technology Affect Productivity?
Apr 9, 2014

 AIM's March 2014 Business Confidence Survey asked two questions.
1. "Has technology allowed your company to produce more goods or provide more services than a decade ago with the same or fewer employees?
2. Can you quantify the economic effect?"


62 percent of the employers who responded said "yes" to the first question.

Among them only some could quantify the benefits. The gains reported in productivity were in  the 10-25 percent range. At the limits,  one manufacturer doubled output without adding workers, and a non-profit service provider more than tripled productivity.

Regarding profit improvement, some manufacturers remarked  that productivity improvements did not strengthen their bottom lines due to downward pressure on prices.  Some  companies in services industries cited offsetting costs from new regulations.
https://blog.aimnet.org/AIM-IssueConnect/bid/103010/How-Does-Technology-Affect-Productivity

Trend 5: Technology enables greater productivity in infrastructure industry
https://home.kpmg.com/xx/en/home/insights/2017/01/trend-5-technology-increases-productivity-risk.html


7. Productivity in Hotels

New JW Marriott hotel rides on technology for productivity
25 March 2017

The 634-room luxury hotel has "taken the initiative to implement new technologies and processes to improve the efficiency of its operations, as well as the overall guest experience" One of the systems  is the (hotel's) use of the Knowledge Touch rostering system to better manage and allocate manpower during peak periods by analysing business volume and needs. the hotel has also adopted Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to track and replace worn-out items such as linen in hotel rooms and  has freed up valuable manpower for more productive uses .
http://www.asiahoreca.com/news/1164711/new-jw-marriott-hotel-rides-on-technology-for-productivity

JW Marriott Resort Saves $100K with Push-to-Talk Tech
12/09/2010
https://hospitalitytech.com/jw-marriott-resort-saves-100k-push-talk-tech

Articles on Industrial Engineering - Toyota Production System Innovations (Lean System)


Toyota Production system (lean manufacturing system) is built on Industrial engineering with the additional focus on rational reduction of inventory. The flow process chart used in IE has two columns for temporary delay and permanent delay. But these were not tackled aggressively earlier. In Toyota, these two wastes were tackled with special attention and focus and systems with less inventory and also other resources came into existence.


Toyota Production System Industrial Engineering - Shigeo Shingo
Introducing and Implementing the Toyota Production System - Shiego Shingo

The SMED System: Shigeo Shingo's Explanation
 Fundamentals of Lean - MIT Courseware

Lean Manufacturing - MIT Courseware

Enterprise Transition to Lean - Road Map -  MIT Courseware
Lean Supply Chain Management -  MIT Courseware

Lean Product Development - MIT Courseware
Lean Engineering  - MIT Courseware



PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT OF A PRESTRESS CONCRETE POLE PLANT USING WORK STUDY TECHNIQUE
http://ijates.com/images/short_pdf/1417439517_P496-508.pdf

A Case Study Improvement of a Testing Process by Combining Lean Management, Industrial Engineering and Automation Methods
2013
http://sparc.nfu.edu.tw/~ijeti/download/V3-no3-134-143.pdf


More Articles on Lean

11. Enterprise Interactions - Wastes -  MIT Courseware

12. People and Organization Issues in Lean Enterprises - MIT Courseware

13. Strategy and Enterprise in Lean Enterprises - MIT Courseware

14. Lean Enterprise - Self Assessment Tools - MIT Courseware

15. Information Systems - MIT Courseware

16. Knowledge Management - MIT Courseware

17. Leadership  - MIT Courseware

18. Lean Enterprise Integration - MIT Courseware

19. Lean Enterprise Architecting  - MIT Courseware

20 Lean Enterprise Case - Lockheed Martin -




One Year Industrial Engineering Knowledge Revision Plan

January - February - March - April - May - June

July - August - September - October - November - December


Updated  1 December 2017,  11 September 2016,  4 January 2015


Sunday, December 24, 2017

Productivity Innovations



Productivity Innovations

Lowering the price can signal innovation in processes. A company can communicate that with convincing story of the innovation involved.
(https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6350893724993712128)  25 December 2017

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Supply Chain Industrial Engineering - Online Book


Supply Chain Industrial Engineering - Explanation


Supply chain industrial engineering is the study of resource use in various supply chain activities with a view to increasing the efficiency or eliminating the waste wherever possible. While the supply chain is designed to serve the needs of the targeted customers, the resource use in the design is carefully investigated by the industrial engineering to identify and remove waste. Industrial engineering succeeded in reducing the cost of many processes designed in the first iteration by the managers up to 50% and hence it is a very important activity in systems design or systems engineering.

Famous example of industrial engineering, is Henry Ford's production system redesign, that reduced the price of the automobile by half.

System Industrial Engineering - System Human Effort Engineering - System Efficiency Engineering


Supply Chain Engineering


 We define "Supply Chain Engineering" as the application of scientific principles to optimize the design and integration of supply chain processes, infrastructure, technology and strategy.(Supply Chain and Logistics Institute at Georgia Tech.)
http://www.scl.gatech.edu/about.php


IE 497 –Supply Chain Engineering
Fall Semester 2012
Course at Penn State University


Course Objective
This course is designed to provide students with a quantitative background for designing, analyzing,
managing, and improving supply chains.

The Chopra & Meindl textbook (prescribed text for the course) is targeted to business students and so it will be supplemented with appropriate
quantitative models.
http://www2.ie.psu.edu/griffin/sc_syllabus.pdf



__________

Supply Chain Industrial Engineers

Scott J. Edwards, Intel Corporation

Scott is an Industrial Engineer in the Supply Chain Industrial Engineering and Statistics department at Intel Corporation. His professional experience includes process improvement, capacity planning and modeling, and network design in logistics/supply chain areas. Scott has a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Management Systems Engineering from Arizona State University and a Masters degree in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix. He is also a certified Six Sigma Black Belt through Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering and received his “Jonah” recognition from Washington State University / TOCICO.

http://www.cpi-symposiums.com/speakers.html
Interesting Presentation by Scott Edwards
http://www.pinnacle-strategies.com/articles/CPI%20Intel%20TOC%20Lean%20Six%20Sigma%20May%202008.pdf


Patrick O'Gorman
Senior Supply Chain Industrial Engineer
Siltronic AG
Public Company; 5001-10,000 employees; Semiconductors industry
March 2009 – September 2012 (3 years 7 months)

Deputy for Supply Chain Management role.
Global capacity / load / utilization analysis and modeling.
Design, implement and improve on manufacturing support systems.
Global inventory reporting.
Revenue forecasting.
Lead and work on cross-functional project teams.
Global Lean Supply Chain initiatives.
SAP/R3 Master Data maintenance and analysis.
Product / Unit / Lot genealogy migration.
Analyze and recommend efficiency and productivity improvements.
Design, implement, and optimize material flow control systems.
Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) - Program development.
Advanced material mix balancing, optimization and maintenance within gemba.
Overall Operator Effectiveness (OOE) - Program development.
Global process and procedure development.
Provide technical expertise to define line equipment layouts and equipment interfaces for material handling/control and overall equipment utilization.
Prepare capital proposals.
Lead and facilitate cross-functional training.
Maintain appropriate documentation for material flow and control systems.
Determine impact on material flow and line balance of process changes, material flow changes, yield enhancements and equipment efficiencies.
KPI & Business Intelligence design.
Global Supply Chain Industrial Engineering team member.
Design planning and scheduling systems to optimize manufacturing systems.
Patrick has 7 recommendations (1 manager, 3 co-workers, 3 partners) including:
3rd Jordan H., MIM Degree Candidate, Portland State University
3rd Chase J., student, Portland State University
Supply Chain Industrial Engineer
Siltronic AG
Public Company; 5001-10,000 employees; Semiconductors industry
March 2007 – March 2009 (2 years 1 month)

Deputy for Operations Management role.
Estimate and update equipment capacities and process standards.
Provide material flow system training to operations.
Design workstations and material fixtures to improve productivity and safety.
Global facility benchmarking.
Analyze manufacturing systems and equipment for performance; inventory level, cycle times, scheduling, utilization and capacity.
Work across functional lines with operations, equipment engineering, and process technology.
Analyze and recommend proposals for changing manufacturing systems.
Data mining.
Support operations, logistics and engineering in daily decision making process regarding flow system problem solving.
Analyze equipment needs and material flow control systems to recommend purchase and layout requirements to enhance systems that improve cycle time, inventory and efficiency.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/globalcitizenpatrickogorman

__________
__________

Human Effort Engineering - Techniques

1. Principles of Motion Economy
2. Motion Study
3. Workstation Design
4. Application of Ergonomics and Biomechanics
5. Fatigue Studies
6. Productivity/Safety/Comfort Device Design
7. Standardization of  Methods
8. Operator training
9. Incentive Systems
10. Job Evaluation
11. Learning effect capture
12. Work Measurement


EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING


1. Process Analysis
2. Operation Analysis
3. Layout Efficiency Analysis
4. Value engineering
5. Statistical quality control
6. Statistical inventory control and ABC Classification Based Inventory Sytems
7. Six sigma
8. Operations research
9. Variety reduction
10. Standardization
11. Incentive schemes
12. Waste reduction or elimination
13. Activity based management
14. Business process improvement
15. Fatigue analysis and reduction
16. Engineering economy analysis
17. Learning effect capture and continuous improvement (Kaizen, Quality circles and suggestion schemes)
18. Standard costing


Functional Solutions

1.Warehouse efficiency improvement
2. Warehouse 5S
3. Warehouse human effort engineering
4. Inventory control




Supply Chain Human Effort Engineering - Techniques


1. Principles of Motion Economy

2. Motion Study
    Wearable computers empower workers to achieve new levels of efficiency in package handling and warehouse applications.
     http://www.mmh.com/article/wearable_computers_optimize_workflows
     MMH - Modern Material Handling Magazine website

3. Workstation Design

4. Application of Ergonomics and Biomechanics
    Warehouse workers - Take the hurt out of material handling
     http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hesis/Documents/warehous.pdf

5. Fatigue Studies

6. Productivity/Safety/Comfort Device Design

7. Standardization of  Methods

8. Operator training

9. Incentive Systems

10. Job Evaluation

11. Learning effect capture

12. Work Measurement


SUPPLY CHAIN SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT



1. Process Analysis
    A Better, Easier Way to Improve Warehouse Operations
    12 Leading case studies
     Steve Anderson, Acorn Systems Inc., 2004
     Request white paper from Acorn Systems

2. Operation Analysis

3. Layout Efficiency Analysis

4. Value engineering

5. Application of Statistics in Supply Chain Planning, Control and Operations


    Forecasting

    Forecasting supply chain components with time series analysis
    Electronic Components and Technology Conference, 2003. Proceedings.
    Date of Conference: May 27-30, 2003
    Author(s): Martin, L.J. and Frei, J. ,  Page(s): 269 278

    Statistical quality control

    Statistical inventory control and ABC Classification Based Inventory Systems

    Supply Chain Risk Management
    ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/sa/wh/n/gbw03015usen/GBW03015USEN.PDF
    Six sigma

    54 statistics on hospital supply chain (efficiency)
    http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/racs-/-icd-9-/-icd-10/54-statistics-on-hospital-supply-chain-efficiency.html

    Supply Chain Monitoring: A Statistics Approach
    Fernando D. Mele, Estanislao Musulin and Luis Puigjaner*
    European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering – 15
    L. Puigjaner and A. Espuña (Editors)
    2005 Elsevier Science B.V.

    Forecasting in Supply Chain
    http://logistics.about.com/od/strategicsupplychain/a/Forecasting.htm



6. Optimization and Operations research

     IBN ILOG
     http://www-01.ibm.com/software/websphere/products/sca/

      http://www.ups.com/content/us/en/bussol/browse/supply-chain-optimization.html

     http://www.scl.gatech.edu/research/supply-chain/10rules.pdf


Companies that take a more strategic approach improve plant output by up to 25% and inventory turns by up to 40% while reducing capital expenditure and increasing the agility, flexibility and speed of the supply chain, according to Bain research. Overall, creating an optimal manufacturing and distribution network increases gross margins by 6 to 10 percentage points.

Turn Your Supply Chain into a Competitive Weapon
December 12, 2017 Bain Brief By Keith Donnelly, Meghan Shehorn and Debjit Banerjee
http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/turn-your-supply-chain-into-a-competitive-weapon.aspx

7. Variety reduction

     Measuring variety reduction along the supply chain: The Variety Gap Model
     by: Alessandro Brun, Margherita Pero, International Journal of Production Economics (May 2012)

     Variety Management in assemble-to-order supply chains
     http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/5250/1/MPRA_paper_5250.pdf

8. Standardization

9. Waste reduction or elimination

     7 Wastes Supply Chain
     http://supplychain-mechanic.com/?p=75

     Lean Supply Chain Practices in Malaysia
     http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/17141/InTech-Lean_supply_chain_practices_and_performance_in_the_context_of_malaysia.pdf

10. Activity based management - Supply Chain Cost Management using Activity Based Cost Measurement and Management

11. Business process improvement

12. Engineering economy analysis

13. Learning effect capture and continuous improvement (Kaizen, Quality circles and suggestion schemes)

14. Standard costing and Kaizen costing

15. Lean Warehousing

Webinar
___________________

___________________


Importance of Effectiveness - Only Effective Supply Chains are to be made efficient

The Triple A Supply Chain - Agile, Adaptive and Aligned
http://hbr.org/2004/10/the-triple-a-supply-chain/ar/1



Supply Chain Efficiency - Supply Chain Waste Elimination - Lean Supply Chain
Supply Chain Industrial Engineering - Bibliography




A Computational Model for Warehouse Analysis and Design
Karathur, Karthik N; Govindaraj, T; Bodner, Douglas A; McGinnis, Leon F. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.



Supply Chain Engineering Books


__________________________


Supply Chain Network Design: Applying Optimization and Analytics to the Global Supply Chain


Michael Watson, Sara Lewis, Peter Cacioppi, Jay Jayaraman
Publisher:  FT Press, Copyright:  2013
Format:  Cloth; 432 pp, Published:  08/22/2012


Table of Contents


Preface     xvi
Part I: Introduction and Basic Building Blocks
Chapter 1: THE VALUE OF SUPPLY CHAIN NETWORK DESIGN     1
Chapter 2: INTUITION BUILDING WITH CENTER OF GRAVITY MODELS     23
Chapter 3: LOCATING FACILITIES USING A DISTANCE-BASED APPROACH     37
Chapter 4: ALTERNATIVE SERVICE LEVELS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS     63
Chapter 5: ADDING CAPACITY TO THE MODEL     83
Part II: Adding Costs to Two-Echelon Supply Chains
Chapter 6: ADDING OUTBOUND TRANSPORTATION TO THE MODEL     99
Chapter 7: INTRODUCING FACILITY FIXED AND VARIABLE COSTS     127
Chapter 8: BASELINES AND OPTIMAL BASELINES     139
Part III: Advanced Modeling and Expanding to Multiple Echelons
Chapter 9: THREE-ECHELON SUPPLY CHAIN MODELING     157
Chapter 10: ADDING MULTIPLE PRODUCTS AND MULTISITE PRODUCTION SOURCING     177
Chapter 11: MULTI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION     207
Part IV: How to Get Industrial-Strength Results
Chapter 12: THE ART OF MODELING     217
Chapter 13: DATA AGGREGATION IN NETWORK DESIGN     237
Chapter 14: CREATING A GROUP AND RUNNING A PROJECT     261
Part V: Case Study Wrap Up
Chapter 15: CASE STUDY: JPMS CHEMICALS CASE STUDY     277
Index     295

http://www.pearsonhighered.com/educator/product/Supply-Chain-Network-Design-Applying-Optimization-and-Analytics-to-the-Global-Supply-Chain/9780133017373.page





Supply Chain Engineering: Models and Applications


By A. Ravi Ravindran, Donald Warsing, Jr.

Published September 27th 2012 by CRC Press – 548 pages


Table of Contents

Introduction to Supply Chain Engineering

Understanding Supply Chains

Flows in Supply Chains

Meaning of Supply Chain Engineering

Supply Chain Decisions

Enablers and Drivers of Supply Chain Performance

Assessing and Managing Supply Chain Performance

Relationship between Supply Chain and Financial Metrics

Importance of Supply Chain Management

Organization of the Textbook

Summary and Further Readings

Exercises

References


Planning Production in Supply Chains

Role of Demand Forecasting in Supply Chain Management

Forecasting Process

Qualitative Forecasting Methods

Quantitative Forecasting Methods

Incorporating Seasonality in Forecasting

Incorporating Trend in Forecasting

Incorporating Seasonality and Trend in Forecasting

Forecasting for Multiple Periods

Forecasting Errors

Monitoring Forecast Accuracy

Forecasting Software

Forecasting in Practice

Production Planning Process

Aggregate Planning Problem

Linear Programming Model for Aggregate Planning

Nonlinear Programming Model for Aggregate Planning

Aggregate Planning as a Transportation Problem

Aggregate Planning Strategies: A Comparison

Summary and Further Readings

Replenishment (CPFR)

Exercises

References


Inventory Management Methods and Models

Decision Framework for Inventory Management

Some Preliminary Modeling Issues

Single-Item, Single-Period Problem: The Newsvendor

Single-Item, Multi-Period Problems

Multi-Item Inventory Models

Multi-Echelon Inventory Systems

Conclusions

Further Readings

A Appendix: The Bullwhip Effect

References

Exercises

References


Transportation Decisions in Supply Chain Management

Introduction

Motor Carrier Freight: Truckload Mode

Accounting for Goods in transit

Stepping Back: Freight Transportation Overview

More General Models of Freight Rates

Building A Rate Model: LTL Service

A More General Rate Model for LTL Service

Beyond Truck Transport: Rail and Air Cargo

Conclusion

Further Readings

Exercises

References


Location and Distribution Decisions in Supply Chains

Modeling with Binary Variables

Supply Chain Network Optimization

Risk Pooling or Inventory Consolidation

Continuous Location Models

Real-World Applications

Summary and Further Readings

Exercises

References


Supplier Selection Models and Methods

Supplier Selection Problem

Supplier Selection Methods

Multi-Criteria Ranking Methods for Supplier Selection

Multi-Objective Supplier Allocation Model

Summary and Further Readings

Exercises

References


Managing Risks in Supply Chain

Supply Chain Risk

Real World Risk Events and Their Impacts

Sources of Supply Chain Risks

Risk Identification

Risk Assessment

Risk Management

Best Industry Practices in Risk Management

Risk Quantification Models

Value-at-Risk (VaR) Models

Miss-the-Target (MtT) Risk Models

Risk Measures

Combining VaR and MtT Type Risks

Risk Detectability and Risk Recovery

Multiple Criteria Optimization Models for Supplier Selection Incorporating Risk

Summary and Further Readings

Exercises

Acknowledgments

References


Global Supply Chain Management

History of Globalization

Impacts of Globalization

Global Sourcing

International Logistics

Designing a Resilient Global Supply Chain: A Case Study

Summary and Further Readings

Exercises

Questions

References

Appendix A: Multiple Criteria Decision Making: An Overview

Index


http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781439811986/

___________________________


Supply Chain Industrial Engineering - IIE Conference Papers






2
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PURCHASING/INVENTORY/MATERIALS (Presentation Supporting Paper)
Hamlin, Jerry; Migliore, R Henry, PhD; Paris, David; Metz, Rick D; Watt, David B. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-10.




5
Integration of Product Structure and Supply Chain Decisions at the Conceptual Design Stage: A Repository Enabled Decision Tool
Chiu, Ming-Chuan; Gupta, Saraj; Okudan, Gül E. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1512-1517.

6
Object-oriented modeling of supply chain configuration problem
Chandra, Charu; Grabis, Janis. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2006): 1-6.

7
 QUEUEING MODELS FOR ANALYZING SUPPLY CHAIN NETWORKS
Srivathsan, Sandeep; Krishnamoorthy, Ananth; Kamath, Manjunath; Ayodhiramanujan, Karthik. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-6.

8
 An Integrative Methodology for Product and Supply Chain Design Decisions at the Product Design Stage
Chiu, Ming-Chuan; Okudan, Gül. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-6.

9
 Supervisory Control of a Synchronized Supply Chain Using Petri Nets
Drzymalski, Julie; Odrey, Nicholas G. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-6.

10
 Supply Chain Risk Management
Hadavale, Rajesh S; Alexander, Suraj M. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1363-1368.



12
 Modeling a Flexible Supply Chain and Logistics System Through Object-Oriented Approach
Kim, Jinho; Rogers, K J, PhD, PE. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2003): 1-6.

13
 A Real-time Simulation-Based Control Architecture for Supply Chain Interactions
Ramakrishnan, Sreeram; Wysk, Richard A. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.

14
 A Rule Based Supply-Chain Business Model Under Object-Oriented Paradigm
Kim, Jinho; Rogers, K J, PhD, PE. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-6.

15
 Conflict and Cooperation of Scheduling in a Two-echelon Supply Chain
Chen, Yuerong; Li, Xueping. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1357-1362.

16
 A Comparison of Coordinated Ordering Policies in a Three-Echelon Supply Chain Network
Abdelmaguid, Tamer F; Marzouk, Mohamed M. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1239-1244.


17
 Inventory Accuracy Improvement via Cycle Counting in a Two-Echelon Supply Chain
Rossetti, Manuel D, PhD, PE; Gumrukcu, Seda; Buyurgan, Nebil; English, John. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 913-918.

18
 A MANUFACTURING STRATEGY FOR PRODUCT ASSEMBLY IN A SUPPLY CHAIN ENVIRONMENT
Sundaram, R Meenakshi; Patel, Rakesh B. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-8.

19
 Reducing Supply Chain Data Degradation in Emerging Networks
Ajoku, Pamela. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 180-185.

20
 The manager's guide to supply chain and logistics problem-solving tools and techniques: Part III: End user experiences
Hicks, Donald A. IIE Solutions29. 11 (Nov 1997): 34-38.

21
 Incomplete information equilibria: Separation theorems and other myths
Feldman, David. Annals of Operations Research151. 1 (Apr 2007): 119-149.




23
 The Effect of Information Update on Optimizing the Supply Chain Single Node Inventory Systems
Haji, Maryam; Darabi, Houshang. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2006): 1-6.




26
 Emerging Supply Chain Drivers (Presentation)
Musselman, Ken. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-55.

27
 The Secrets of Supply Chain Success: A Retail Case Study (Presentation)
Anonymous. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-33.

28
 Reverse Logistics: Designing Your Supply Chain for Product Recovery (Presentation)
Barker, Theresa J; Zabinsky, Zelda B. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-18.

29
 Supply Chain Breakthrough Strategy: On-site MRO Partner-Managed Storeroom (Presentation)
Stein, Martin; Krauter, George. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1-32.

30
 Driving Benefits from the Supply Chain: A Case Study (Presentation)
Miksis, Michael. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2003): 1-18.

31
 Integrating Supply Chain Management and Maintenance Philosophies (Presentation)
Siriram, R; Cobb, P. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2005): 1-43.

32
 Optimization Opportunities to Improve Supply Chain Efficiency: A Practitioner's Experiences (Presentation)
Saxena, Rajiv. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-22.



35
 It's all in the delivery
Anonymous. Industrial Engineer37. 1 (Jan 2005): 52.



36
 Managing Oil and Gas Supply Chain - Numerous Challenges, One Solution (Presentation)
Mehta, Arvind. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-14.

37
 Supply Chain Risk Management (Presentation)
Anonymous. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2005): 1-21.

38
 Supply Chain Solution Using Six Sigma: A Case Study Based on a Project for Square D Company (Presentation)
Anonymous. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 1-19.

39
 Integrating Engineering for Supply Chain Effectiveness (Presentation)
Dickerson, James. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 1-24.

40
 Simulation of Supply Chain System Costs for Industrial Audiences (Presentation)
Ray, Charles D, Ph D. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2005): 1-46.



43
 Designing principles to create resilient Supply Chains
Carvalho, Helena; Machado, V Cruz. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 186-191.






50
 Use of OR to Design Your Reverse Logistics Supply Chain (Presentation)
Barker, Theresa J; Zabinsky, Zelda B. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1-25.
..."Use of OR to Design Your Reverse Logistics hitSupply Chain" during the Jun 01,

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Save to My Research
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51
 General Purpose Ontologies for Supply Chain Management
Ahmad, Ali; Mollaghasemi, Mansooreh; Rabelo, Luis. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-7.

 A methodology for the strategic design of robust global supply chains
Goetschalckx, Marc; Cordova, Gonzalo. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-6.

53
 Modeling and Mitigating Global Supply Chain Risk Management
Yang, Dengfeng; Wang, Jiao; Li, Xueping; Sawhney, Rapinder. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1339-1344.

54
 AN INTERNET ENABLED SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES
Magableh, Ghazi M; Abu-Ali, Mahmoud. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-6.

55
 Benefits of Incorporating Supply Chain Decisions into the Product Design via Design for Supply Chain
Gokhan, N Mehmet; Needy, Kim LaScola; Norman, Bryan A; Hunsaker, Brady. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2008): 390-395.

56
 Supply Chain Reconfiguration: Designing Information Support With System Taxonomy Principles
Chandra, Charu; Tumanyan, Armen. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.


58
 An Improved Supplier Selection Method Integrated to the Conceptual Design Phase
Chiu, Ming-Chuan; Okudan, Gül. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1518-1523.

59
 Supply chain system taxonomy: development and application
Chandra, Charu; Tumanyan, Armen. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2003): 1-6.

60
 Taxonomy of Research Directions for Sustainable Supply Chain Management
Badurdeen, Fazleena; Metta, Haritha; Gupta, Sonal. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1256-1261.

61
 Use of Shared Information in a Vendor-Managed Inventory (VMI) Supply Chain
Angulo, Andres; Nachtmann, Heather; Waller, Matthew. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.

62
 Combining Strategic and Tactical Decisions in an Integrated Supply Chain
Sajjadi, S Reza; Cheraghi, S Hossein. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1149-1154.

63
 A Hybrid Solution Procedure for Design for Supply Chain Problems
Gokhan, N Mehmet; Needy, Kim LaScola; Norman, Bryan A; Hunsaker, Brady. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 1678-1683.

64
 Quantifying the Bullwhip Effect in the Supply Chain of Small-Sized Companies
Centeno, Martha A; Pérez, Jaime E. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 486-491.

65
 Supply Chain Models for Small Agricultural Enterprises
Jang, W; Klein, C M. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.


67
 Design for Supply Chain - A Collaborative Research Project Between Institutions and Between Centers
Needy, Kim L; Norman, Bryan A; Hunsaker, Brady; Gokhan, N Mehmet; Claypool, Erin; et al. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2008): 396-401.


69
 Reverse Logistics Optimization with Data Envelopment Analysis
Tonanont, Ake; Yimsiri, Sanya; Rogers, K J. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2009): 1268-1273.


71
 The Impact of the Internet Economy on Logistics
Sehwail, Loay; Ingalls, Ricki G. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2005): 1-6.

 Applying Radio Frequency Identification for Cutting Tool Supply Chain Management
Cheng, Chen-Yang; Prabhu, Vittal. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 637-642.







78
 A Framework for Cost Modeling a Supply Chain
Yousef, Nabeel; Rabelo, Luis; Sepulveda, Jose. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2006): 1-6.

79
 Stakeholder value mapping framework for supply chain improvement when implementing IT solutions
Alvarado, Karla P; Rabelo, Luis; Eaglin, Ronald. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2008): 1320-1325.

80
 Simulation-Optimisation Methods in Supply Chain Applications: A Review
Abo-Hamad, Waleed; Arisha, Amr. Irish Journal of Management30. 2 (2011): 95-124.

81
 Goal-Driven Supply Chain Design
Chandra, Charu; Grabis, Janis. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2008): 241-246.

82
 Elaborating Process Models for Supply Chain Reconfiguration
Chandra, Charu; Marukyan, Ruzanna. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-6.

83
 Integrated Supply Chain Management: Discrete Manufacturing (Presentation Supporting Paper)
Kumar, Dinesh. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-5.


85
 Information Modeling to Manage Supply Chain: Problems Taxonomy
Chandra, Charu; Tumanyan, Armen. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-6.

86
 Achieving Supply Chain Optimization: Guiding Your Organization's Improvement Journey (Presentation Supporting Paper)
Pinnekamp, Dale J, CPIM. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2007): 1-7.

87
 Value Chain Management (VCM) Principles, Framework, and Footprint (Presentation)
Sabri, Ehap; Rehman, Aamer. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1-22.


89
 Increased Supply Chain Efficiencies through Integration
Magableh, Ghazi M; Mason, Scott J. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2003): 1-6.


91
 Optimization Strategies for Complex Supply Chains (Presentation)
Lathon, Ruby D, PhD. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2006): 1-26.

92
 Applied Operational Research Techniques to Balance Costs & Service in Customers' Supply Chains (Presentation)
Jeray, Jim. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2002): 1-37.

93
 A Maturity Model to Assess and Improve Supply Chain Operations
Giachetti, Ronald E; Garcia-Reyes, Heriberto. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-6.

94
 Collaborative implementation of e-business processes within the health-care supply chain: the Monash Pharmacy Project
Bhakoo, Vikram; Chan, Caroline. Supply Chain Management16. 3 (2011): 184-193.

95
 ANALYSIS OF A TRANSPORTATION CONTRACT IN A SUPPLY CHAIN
Sinha, Sudhir K; Rangaraj, N; Hemachandra, N. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2006): 1-6.

96
 Considering Customer Waiting Time in Supply Chain Integration
Masel, Dale T; Pujari, Nikhil A. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2005): 1-6.

97
 REDUCING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT TIME USING CRITICAL CHAIN PROJECT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES (Presentation)
Ross, James. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2003): 1-40.

98
 A Method for Measuring Supply Chain Interoperability
Ford, Thomas C, PhD; Ogden, Jeffrey A, PhD; Johnson, Alan W, PhD. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2010): 1-6.

99
 Development of a Framework for Supply Chain Research in Industrial Engineering
Krishnamoorthy, Ananth; Kamath, Manjunath; Ingalls, Ricki G. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings (2004): 1.

IE students and faculty can access these papers from Proquest Database


Industrial Engineering Faculty Members with focus on Supply Chain Industrial Engineering

http://comp.uark.edu/~mason/Research.html





Supply Chain Human Effort Engineering - Techniques

1. Principles of Motion Economy
 
2. Motion Study
    Wearable computers empower workers to achieve new levels of efficiency in package handling and warehouse applications.
     http://www.mmh.com/article/wearable_computers_optimize_workflows
     MMH - Modern Material Handling Magazine website

3. Workstation Design

4. Application of Ergonomics and Biomechanics
    Warehouse workers - Take the hurt out of material handling
     http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hesis/Documents/warehous.pdf

5. Fatigue Studies

6. Productivity/Safety/Comfort Device Design

7. Standardization of  Methods

8. Operator training

9. Incentive Systems

10. Job Evaluation

11. Learning effect capture

12. Work Measurement


SUPPLY CHAIN SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT


1. Process Analysis
    A Better, Easier Way to Improve Warehouse Operations
    12 Leading case studies
     Steve Anderson, Acorn Systems Inc., 2004
     Request white paper from Acorn Systesm

2. Operation Analysis

3. Layout Efficiency Analysis

4. Value engineering

5. Application of Statistics in Supply Chain Planning, Control and Operations


    Forecasting

    Forecasting supply chain components with time series analysis
    Electronic Components and Technology Conference, 2003. Proceedings.
    Date of Conference: May 27-30, 2003
    Author(s): Martin, L.J. and Frei, J. ,  Page(s): 269 278

    Statistical quality control

    Statistical inventory control and ABC Classification Based Inventory Systems

    Supply Chain Risk Management
    ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/sa/wh/n/gbw03015usen/GBW03015USEN.PDF
    Six sigma

    54 statistics on hospital supply chain (efficiency)
    http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/racs-/-icd-9-/-icd-10/54-statistics-on-hospital-supply-chain-efficiency.html

    Supply Chain Monitoring: A Statistics Approach
    Fernando D. Mele, Estanislao Musulin and Luis Puigjaner*
    European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering – 15
    L. Puigjaner and A. Espuña (Editors)
    2005 Elsevier Science B.V.

    Forecasting in Supply Chain
    http://logistics.about.com/od/strategicsupplychain/a/Forecasting.htm

 

6. Optimization and Operations research

     IBN ILOG
     http://www-01.ibm.com/software/websphere/products/sca/

      http://www.ups.com/content/us/en/bussol/browse/supply-chain-optimization.html

     http://www.scl.gatech.edu/research/supply-chain/10rules.pdf
   

7. Variety reduction

     Measuring variety reduction along the supply chain: The Variety Gap Model
     by: Alessandro Brun, Margherita Pero, International Journal of Production Economics (May 2012)

     Variety Management in assemble-to-order supply chains
     http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/5250/1/MPRA_paper_5250.pdf

8. Standardization

9. Waste reduction or elimination

     7 Wastes Supply Chain
     http://supplychain-mechanic.com/?p=75

     Lean Supply Chain Practices in Malaysia
     http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/17141/InTech-Lean_supply_chain_practices_and_performance_in_the_context_of_malaysia.pdf

10. Activity based management

11. Business process improvement

12. Engineering economy analysis

13. Learning effect capture and continuous improvement (Kaizen, Quality circles and suggestion schemes)

14. Standard costing and Kaizen costing


Importance of Effectiveness - Only Effective Supply Chains are to be made efficient

The Triple A Supply Chain - Agile, Adaptive and Aligned
http://hbr.org/2004/10/the-triple-a-supply-chain/ar/1



Books


Excellence in Inventory Management
Author: Stuart Emmett and David Granville
Edition: First
Publisher: Cambridge Academic
Date: 05/01/2007



Updated on  22 December 2017,  12 May 2015
First Published on 2 March 2013


Sunday, December 17, 2017

New Technology - Understanding, Analysis and Improvement by Industrial Engineers


Understanding the New Technology - Engineering Economic Analysis - Productivity Assessment and Improvement



"Industrial engineers design, improve, and install integrated systems of people, materials, information, equipment, and energy." Key among these things we do are improvement and integration. "Industrial engineers are involved in products, processes, and services, from "hard-core" manufacturing to health care and insurance"

Source: "Technology's Impact on the Future of Industrial Engineering"
C. Patrick Koelling, Mario G. Beruvides, and Kriengkrai Tankoonsombut,
Computers ind. Engng VoL 31, No. 1/'2, pp. 5 - 8,1996
19th International Conference on Computers and Industrial Engineering

Industrial engineering improves productivity of production and other engineering systems through redesigning products, processes and optimizing using mathematical and statistical methods. It also uses economic analysis to identify and reject non economic engineering ideas or designs. It measures work, cost and productivity to understand the current performance of engineering systems. It redesign human work to improve productivity. It examines the productivity impact of  management methods and redesigns them also. It also takes responsibility for productivity management of the organization. So whenever a new technology emerges in an organization or a potentially useful technology emerges in the environment industrial engineers have the responsibility to understand it, analyze it and improve it.

Understanding the New Technology


The is the starting point. Because industrial engineers are responsible for productivity measurement and improvement of the use of new technology in the organization, they have to begin understanding it the moment they become aware of it. They have to start reading the articles, the brochures distributed by the sellers of the technology or developers of the technology, attend seminars on technology, and utilise the opportunities to observe the technology in use etc.  

Engineering Economic Analysis


The next step after adequate understanding is the engineering economic analysis. Whenever a new technology appears, industrial engineers have to identify the defender technology in the organization and see whether in the economic analysis the new technology wins or the defender technology wins. If the new technology wins, they have to recommend its adoption. To do engineering economic analysis, industrial engineers have to estimate the costs and benefits of the new technology and defender technology. This forces them to go into more details of the new technology and as they complete the engineering economic analysis, they will have much better grasp of the new technology. 

In case the defender technology wins, the adoption of the new technology is postponed. But industrial engineers have to monitor developments in new technology that are going to improve cost parameters of the new technology. So, industrial engineers have redo engineering economic analysis of new technology versus defender technology periodically to check and find time at which the new technology becomes economically the appropriate choice. In this exercise, industrial engineers become more and more conversant with the technology.

Productivity Assessment and Improvement


Engineering economic analysis is a strategical level analysis in the problem of technology adoption. As the technology is being implemented in the organization various problems crop up and technology implementors come out with various adhoc solutions to solve the teething problems that are more location specific. When  the production bugs are sorted out and commercial production starts, the project of technology implementation is declared success and closed. Now the responsibility of running the facilities with the new technology is transferred to the operations function. Industrial engineers now have the responsibility of recording the actual processes being used by the operations people and evaluate the productivity implications of them. This particular studies can be categorised as "operations industrial engineering analysis." Operation analysis is the term used by H.B. Maynard to study the production process of a component or product. It involves the study of every resource used in the production process to identify waste, come out with an engineering idea to eliminate the waste and do the required design or arrange for the required development and design so that low cost alternatives that eliminate the waste are implemented in the process. This is the productivity improvement contribution by industrial engineers. Productivity improvement studies of a process are to be conducted periodically and also whenever IEs feel that there is a technological development that has the potential to improve productivity of a process. This makes the industrial engineering department responsible for monitoring technology developments that have productivity benefits for the organization.

Updated on 18 December 2017, 4 May 2017

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Applied Industrial Engineering - 2017 Bulletin



Applied Industrial Engineering

IE in New Technologies - IE with New Technologies


Implementation of  Industrial Engineering Principles and Techninques in New Technologies (Engineering Processes) and Business Processes

1. Additive Manufacturing Productivity


Assembly Design Framework for Additive Manufacturing Based on Axiomatic Design Concept
https://www.xcdsystem.com/iise/abstract/File7673/UploadFinalPaper_2655.pdf
Yosep Oh, University at Buffalo; Sara Behdad, University at Buffalo, SUNY

Abstract:

AM productivity

According to the design for assembly (DFA) concept, design features should be integrated into a few physical parts to reduce design complexity.  However, building up a single product can have some negative effects on the AM productivity by increasing buildup time and cost. In this paper, a design framework using the assembly concept is proposed with the aim of letting the AM productivity reach an allowable level. The design framework is developed based on an Axiomatic Design (AD) approach, where AM productivity elements including buildup time, assembly time and the amount of support are considered as non-functional requirements (nFRs). The AM productivity is assessed by the Information Axiom to choose the best design. The proposed design framework can help engineers design and evaluate AM products.

Interesting references cited in the paper

* Thomas, D.S. and Gilbert, S.W., 2014, Costs and Cost Effectiveness of Additive Manufacturing - A Literature Review and Discussion, NIST.
* Oh, Y. and Behdad, S., 2016, Assembly Based Part Design to Improve the Additive Manufacturing
Productivity: Process Time, Cost and Surface Roughness, ASME IDETC, Charlotte, NC, USA.
* Zhang, Y., Bernard, A., Gupta, R.K. and Harik, R., 2014, Evaluating the Design for Additive Manufacturing: A
Process Planning Perspective, Procedia CIRP, 21, 144–150.
* Thompson, M.K., 2013, Improving the Requirements Process in Axiomatic Design Theory, CIRP Annals - Manufacturing Technology, 62, 115–118.


2. Biomanufacturing (Biotechnology) Productivity

Productivity in Biomanufacturing

Researchers are examining the possibility of taking  advantage of the natural differences in productivity among cells that are used in biomanufacturing. They foster mutations to create genetic variability and then use microchips to analyze the behavior of individual cells, choosing the most prolific for larger-scale production.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/424695/why-is-biomanufacturing-so-hard/


3. Productivity and Nanotech

Productive Nanotech Systems
https://www.foresight.org/roadmaps/Nanotech_Roadmap_2007_main.pdf

Related

OSRAM Boosts LED Chip Productivity With Nanotechnology
Aug 27, 2014
https://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news/newsid=37099.php

4. Electric Batteries and Productivity Applications

Nano One Enhances Pilot Productivity and Files a New Patent

Vancouver B.C. Dr. Stephen Campbell, Principal Scientist at Nano One Materials, today announced that Nano One has filed a patent related to yield improvements in its process for the manufacture of lithium metal oxide cathode materials for use in advanced lithium ion batteries.
August 2017

https://nanoone.ca/nano-one-enhances-pilot-productivity-files-new-patent/


5. IoT and Productivity

McKinsey Global Institute Report
THE INTERNET OF THINGS: MAPPING THE VALUE BEYOND THE HYPE
JUNE 2015
You can donwload the report from the web
(Link)


How the Internet of Things will reshape future production systems
By Vineet Gupta and Rainer Ulrich
September 2017
https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/operations/our-insights/how-the-internet-of-things-will-reshape-future-production-systems


6. New Technology and Equipment for Productivity

PONSSE INTRODUCES NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTIVITY AND ERGONOMICS
Virtual reality (VR) training simulator.
http://www.ponsse.com/fr/media-archive/nouvelles/ponsse-introduces-new-technology-for-productivity-and-ergonomics

How Does Technology Affect Productivity?
Apr 9, 2014

 AIM's March 2014 Business Confidence Survey asked two questions.
1. "Has technology allowed your company to produce more goods or provide more services than a decade ago with the same or fewer employees?
2. Can you quantify the economic effect?"


62 percent of the employers who responded said "yes" to the first question.

Among them only some could quantify the benefits. The gains reported in productivity were in  the 10-25 percent range. At the limits,  one manufacturer doubled output without adding workers, and a non-profit service provider more than tripled productivity.

Regarding profit improvement, some manufacturers remarked  that productivity improvements did not strengthen their bottom lines due to downward pressure on prices.  Some  companies in services industries cited offsetting costs from new regulations.
https://blog.aimnet.org/AIM-IssueConnect/bid/103010/How-Does-Technology-Affect-Productivity

Trend 5: Technology enables greater productivity in infrastructure industry
https://home.kpmg.com/xx/en/home/insights/2017/01/trend-5-technology-increases-productivity-risk.html


7. Productivity in Hotels

New JW Marriott hotel rides on technology for productivity
25 March 2017

The 634-room luxury hotel has "taken the initiative to implement new technologies and processes to improve the efficiency of its operations, as well as the overall guest experience" One of the systems  is the (hotel's) use of the Knowledge Touch rostering system to better manage and allocate manpower during peak periods by analysing business volume and needs. the hotel has also adopted Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to track and replace worn-out items such as linen in hotel rooms and  has freed up valuable manpower for more productive uses .
http://www.asiahoreca.com/news/1164711/new-jw-marriott-hotel-rides-on-technology-for-productivity

JW Marriott Resort Saves $100K with Push-to-Talk Tech
12/09/2010
https://hospitalitytech.com/jw-marriott-resort-saves-100k-push-talk-tech

Friday, December 8, 2017

Soft Skills for Industrial Engineers



At the 1972 CONARC (US Army) Soft Skills Conference Dr. Whitmore presented a report  aimed at figuring out how the term "soft skills" (in the areas of command, supersivion, counceling and leadership) is understood in various CONARC schools. Based on this research study,  the following definition was formulated:

"Soft skills are important job-related skills that involve little or no interaction with machines and whose application on the job is quite generalized.

It was also highlighted that hard skills are related to machines, and we understand laws and operations related to machines well. But, we do not the laws related to fellow human beings that well and hence in the case of soft skills, education and training is not that straight forward.

It can be said and simplified that soft skills are people skills. In Industrial Engineering curriculums, we include subjects related to organizational behavior, and the content of this subject must have the objective of increasing the knowledge and skills involved in the interacting with people in cooperative ventures.




Kantrowitz classified soft skills into seven main clusters

1. self management and self performance management skills.

2. Managing others and Managing others' performance management.

3. Organization/leadership skills

4. Interpersonal skills

5. Communication/Persuasion skills

6. Political/Cultural skills

7. Counterproductive skills

You can read more about each of these skill categories in

Organizational Behavior - Review Notes - Based on Fred Luthans Book


Negotiation skills

Negotiations - Knowledge, Research and Skills
http://nraomtr.blogspot.com/2017/12/negotiations-knowledge-research-and.html

IEMS 345: NEGOTIATION
https://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/industrial/courses/descriptions/345.html

Listening and Negotiation
2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition
https://www.asee.org/public/conferences/64/papers/15160/view


https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Soft_skills.html

Cost Reduction and Optimization for Manufacturing and Industrial Companies - Joseph Berk - Book Information



http://as.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470609575,descCd-tableOfContents.html


Introduction.
Chapter 1: Organizing a Cost-Reduction Program.

Part I Labor.

Chapter 2: Head Count.

Chapter 3: Time Standards.

Chapter 4: Efficiency.

Chapter 5: Utilization.

Chapter 6: Overtime.

Chapter 7: Multiple Shifts.

Chapter 8: Lost Time.

Chapter 9: The Learning Curve.

Part II Material.

Chapter 10: Make-versus-Buy Determinations.

Chapter 11: Inventory Minimization.

Chapter 12: Material Utilization.

Chapter 13: Minimizing Supplier Costs.

Chapter 14: Supplier Negotiation.

Chapter 15: Supplier Competition.

Part III Process.

Chapter 16: Work-Flow Optimization.

Chapter 17: Setup Time Reduction.

Chapter 18: Material-Handling Improvements.

Chapter 19: Scrap and Rework Reduction.

Chapter 20: Cleanliness.

Part IV Design.

Chapter 21: The Design Approach.

Chapter 22: Requirements Relaxation.

Chapter 23: Tolerance Relaxation.

Chapter 24: Materials Substitution.

Chapter 25: Packaging.

Part V Overhead.

Chapter 26: General Overhead Expenses.

Chapter 27: Travel.

Chapter 28: Inspection.

Part VI Gaining Disciples and Measuring Progress.

Chapter 29: Suggestion Programs.

Chapter 30: Measuring Progress.

Index.


Google Book Link with Preview facility
http://books.google.co.in/books?id=1Tc6YlglMUkC




14. Supplier Negotiation

Chapter sections:

The Bottom Line

Key Questions

The Supplier Negotiation Road Map

Planning

The First Offer

Multiple Issues

Concessions

Tracking Progress

Negotiation Traps

Impasses

Negotiation Power

Conclude Negotiations Professionally

Training

Who Should Do This Work

Risks

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9780470643815.ch14/summary



Updated 9 December 2017, 29 June 2013

Industrial Engineering - Health Care Partnership

Evolution of Industrial Engineering - 1908 to 2017 - Shop Management to Productivity Science, Engineering and Management



The motivation to write this article is provided by the paper, Sahney VK, Evolution of hospital industrial engineering: from scientific management to total quality management.
J Soc Health Syst. 1993;4(1):3-17.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8268467


Shop management paper/book has the objective low cost product and high income employees. The focus of the book is achieving low cost of production and high income provision to employees (from the existing position at that time) in engineering production shops. Industrial engineering became the subject that was developed to educate and train engineers in a specialized subject dealing with productivity and cost reduction. Very quickly it became a full fledged four year degree based curriculum as productivity and cost reduction are important dimensions of engineering organizations.

In the course of evolution, emphasis on redesign of the products and processes using engineering knowledge to provide cost reduction and productivity became less. This led to industrial engineering being labelled as imaginary engineering (a branch wherein engineering is nonexistent). The erosion of engineering focus also resulted in IE's narrow reach. Industrial engineering is applicable in all engineering branches that have engineering products or services and processes producing those products and services. Therefore, industrial engineering needs to be used in civil engineering, electrical engineering, electronics engineering, biomedical engineering and biotechnology. Engineering is an essential knowledge discipline in the world and industrial engineering has to focus on all engineering branches and improve productivity.

Prof. Narayana Rao, brought out this shortcoming clearly in a paper and also proposed principles of industrial engineering.  Principles of industrial engineering were derived from Principles of Scientific Management of Taylor. The principles of reflect the current concerns and areas of focus of the discipline. 


Industrial Engineering Scholars (Academic, Researching and Practicing Industrial Engineers)

F.W. Taylor
Frank Gilbreth
Lilian Gilbreth
Harrington Emerson
Henri Gantt
Alan Mogensen
R.L. Barnes
Marvin Mundel
H.B. Maynard
Shigeo Shingo
David Sumanth
D. Scott Sink
Gavriel Salvendy
Yamashina
Narayana Rao, K.V.S.S.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Culture and Productivity - Bibliography


2017


Culture and productivity – an equation for success
KPMG
2017
https://assets.kpmg.com/content/dam/kpmg/au/pdf/2017/organisational-culture-productivity-for-success.pdf

2016

National Culture, Creativity, and Productivity: What’s the Relationship with Student Achievement?
Zheng Fang, Xianxuan Xu, Leslie W. Grant, James H. Stronge & Thomas J. Ward
Pages 395-406 | Published online: 14 Nov 2016
Journal
Creativity Research Journal
Volume 28, 2016 - Issue 4
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10400419.2016.1229976?journalCode=hcrj20

Culture, religion and productivity: Evidence from European regions
Anneli Kaasa
BEH - Business and Economic Horizons
Volume 12 | Issue 1 | 2016 |pp.11-28
https://academicpublishingplatforms.com/downloads/pdfs/beh/volume21/201612010102_02_BEH_Vol12_Issue1_2016_Kaasa_Culture_religion_and_productivity_evidence_from_European_regions_pp.11-28.pdf


2015

Proof That Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive
Emma SeppalaKim Cameron
DECEMBER 01, 2015
Harvard Business Review
https://hbr.org/2015/12/proof-that-positive-work-cultures-are-more-productive

Impact of Organizational Culture on Productivity and Quality
Management: a Case Study in Diamond Operations Unit, DTC
Botswana
Kabelo Kelepile
International Journal of Research in Business Studies and Management
Volume 2, Issue 9, September 2015, PP 35-45
ISSN 2394-5923 (Print) & ISSN 2394-5931 (Online)
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d891/20dd6dd561c7d028f93d31d2930d119a3f47.pdf

The impact of work-life culture on organizational productivity
Isabel de Sivatte, Judith R. Gordon, Pilar Rojo, Ricardo Olmos, (2015) "The impact of work-life culture on organizational productivity", Personnel Review, Vol. 44 Issue: 6, pp.883-905, https://doi.org/10.1108/PR-12-2013-0226
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/PR-12-2013-0226


2014

Investigate the Relationship between Organizational Culture and Human
Resources Productivity (Case study: Arman Credit Institute)
Hamed Mohammadi, and Ahmed Raza Shekarchizadeh
International Journal of Management and Humanity Sciences. Vol., 3 (8), 2744-2751, 2014
Available online at http://www.ijmhsjournal.com

The Influences of organisational cultural practices on productivity in
prison farms in Zimbabwe
David D. Madzikanda and Tinashe Muroiwa
University of Zimbabwe Business Review, Volume 2, No. 2, 2014
http://ir.uz.ac.zw/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10646/2744/Madzikanda_The_influence_of_organisational_cultural_practices_on_productivity_in_prison_farms.pdf?sequence=1


2013

2013

The impact of culture and employee-focused criteria on productivity: A structural equation modelling approach
AIP Conference Proceedings 1522, 1442 (2013); https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4801299
Mohd Rashid Ab Hamid

Culture and employee-focus are factors that have an impact on productivity and they have to be aligned with the productivity initiatives in the organization in order to increase productivity.  Therefore, this article investigated the impact of culture and employee-focused criteria on productivity in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia using intangible indicators through core values.
http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.4801299

Improving workplace productivity and corporate culture: perceptions and experiences of the
effects of workplace massage
Deborah Nicola Lane
Submitted to satisfy the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
College of Sport and Exercise Science
Victoria University
March 2013
http://vuir.vu.edu.au/21896/1/Deborah%20Nicola%20Lane.pdf



2012

Organizational Culture and its effect on productivity; the case study of
La Community Bank
by
Dwirantwi, Eric Addo
(PG.4159710)
A thesis submitted to the Institute Of Distance Learning, Kwame Nkrumah
University of Science and Technology in partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the degree of
COMMONWEALTH EXECUTIVE MASTERS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
September, 2012
http://ir.knust.edu.gh/bitstream/123456789/4818/1/Dwirantwi%2C%20Eric%20Addo.pdf



How Participative Leadership Powers a Culture of Productivity
© 2012 WorldatWork.  | www.worldatwork.org
https://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=65388



IZA DP No. 6845
Cultural Diversity and Plant‐Level Productivity
September 2012
Michaela Trax
Stephan Brunow
Jens Suedekum
http://ftp.iza.org/dp6845.pdf

2011


Organizational culture and productivity
Ahmadi, Ebadollaha
Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences 15 (2011) 772–776
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042811003612




2006
Organisational Culture, Productivity and the South African Work Place: A Case Study of Cranco Metals Ltd.
Alternation, 13,2, 2006
http://alternation.ukzn.ac.za/Files/docs/13.2/02%20Map.pdf

2002

Productivity, Culture and Society: The Essential Contribution of Psychology as a
Social Science
ISBN #: 189653872X
This paper was prepared for the Scientific Affairs Committee of the Canadian Psychological Association
by Dr. John Service, Executive Director, and Dr. Patrick O’Neill, Chair, Scientific Affairs.
http://www.cpa.ca/documents/Productivity_Culture_Society.pdf


1996

CULTURE AND PRODUCTIVITY IN THE HOTEL INDUSTRY
A STUDY OF ORGANIZATION BEHAVIOUR OF CHINESE FINANCIAL
CONTROLLERS IN HONG KONG HOTELS.
A Thesis submifted by
Duncan Andrew GIBSON
in fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the Degree of Ph. D.
Surrey European Management School
University of Surrey
1996
http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/875/1/fulltext.pdf


Is group productivity loss the rule or the exception? Effects of culture and Group based Motivation
Erez, Miriam; Somech, Anit
Academy of Management Journal; Dec 1996; 39, 6;

Culture, Productivity and Structure: A Singapore Study
Foo Check-Teck
Volume: 13 issue: 4, page(s): 589-609
Issue published: October 1, 1992
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/017084069201300404


1986

Finding the culture of productivity.

Akin, G., & Hopelain, D. (1986). Finding the culture of productivity. Organizational Dynamics, 14(3), 19-32.


Investigates factors related to productivity from work culture perspective. Environments that encourage productivity are described.   The worker perceptions of the structures and elements that constitute work culture and the qualities that make for a strong culture of productivity are elicited.

The term "culture of productivity" refers to the shared understandings of workers in highly productive settings and the commonly known procedures and rules these workers use to understand productivity and to be productive.

Results and findings from the investigation suggest that productivity occurs when management, supervisors, and workers focus primarily on the work being produced and factors influencing successful outcomes. It is concluded that essential qualities of productive cultures are legibility, coherence, and adaptation/flexibility in the workplace.
http://psycnet.apa.org/record/1986-31490-001