Saturday, October 19, 2013

Industrial Engineering Techniques - Articles, Books, Courses


Work Study Course for Shipyard Personnel - Course Material
http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA451977&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf



Introduction to Industrial Engineering -  Course Page






France in the Age of Organization: Factory, Home and Nation from the 1920s to Vichy


ackie,

Berghahn Books, 15-Jun-2011 - History - 228 pages
In interwar France, there was a growing sense that ‘organization’ was the solution to the nation’s perceived social, economic and political ills. This book examines the roots of this idea in the industrial rationalization movement and its manifestations in areas as diverse as domestic organization and economic planning. In doing so, it shows how experts in fields ranging from engineering to the biological sciences shaped visions of a rational socio-economic order from the 1920s to Vichy and beyond.

 Google Book Link
http://books.google.co.in/books?id=B3euy5UJbsoC



The Human Motor: Energy, Fatigue, and the Origins of Modernity
Anson Rabinbach

University of California Press, 1992 - Philosophy - 402 pages
"Masterfully integrating Europe-wide debates in science, philosophy, technology, economics, and social policy, Rabinbach has provided us with a profoundly original understanding of the productivist obsessions from which we are still painfully freeing ourselves. . . . A splendid example of the mutual enrichment of intellectual and social history. It goes well beyond its central concern with the 'science of work' to illuminate everything it discusses, from Marxism to the social uses of photography, from cultural decadence to the impact of the First World War."--Martin Jay, University of California, Berkeley

Google Book Link
http://books.google.co.in/books?id=e5ZBNv-zTlQC

Course Outline - Industrial Engineering - 40 hours program by Protech

Industrial Engineering Techniques is an on-site 40-hour program, normally presented in five consecutive days, which provides new engineers, supervisors, non-IEs, and other technical and non-technical personnel a grounding in classical Industrial Engineering methods and procedures.

The program relies heavily on interactive demonstrations, teamwork, video, and class exercises. This program has been presented many times for automobile manufacturers and OEM suppliers, and uses numerous video examples of real plant scenes in fabrication and assembly operations. The overall program consists of several "modules" that may added or deleted to produce a custom program of 24 to 40 hour duration if desired.

1.0  Introduction to Industrial Engineering and Methods Analysis
     1.1  Definition of Industrial Engineering
     1.2  Relationship of Method to Time
     1.3  IE History; Taylor and Gilbreth

2.0  Methods Analysis and Work Measurement
     2.1  Manufacturing Systems and Concepts
     2.2  Methods Analysis and the Methods Engineering Approach
     2.3  Work Measurement

3.0  Manufacturing Systems Analysis
     3.1  Methods of Organizing Information
     3.2  Symbol systems
     3.3  The Fabrication Chart
     3.4  The Precedence Chart
     3.5  The Flow Chart
     3.6  The Process Chart
     3.7  The Flow-Process Chart

4.0  The Analysis of Manual Methods
     4.1  Components of job study; task, element, act, motion,
     4.2  Purposes of  job analyses
     4.3  Effects on method
     4.4  Variation in Output within Fixed Limits
     4.5  The Acts
     4.6  Review of analysis form and sample Act Breakdown
     4.7  Progressive improvement

5.0  Methods Summary Charting
     5.1  Definition and purpose of methods summary charting
     5.2  Types of charts; man/man, man/machine
     5.3  Review of methods summary chart
     5.4  Video exercises

6.0  Ineffective Worker Movement Analysis
     6.1  Definition
     6.2  Causes of Ineffective Worker Movements
     6.3  Video examples
     6.4  Six steps of analysis
     6.5  Analysis form--Ineffective Worker Movement
     6.6  Team exercises

7.0  Motion Economy and Workplace Layout
     7.1  Improving the motion path; barriers
     7.2  Workplace layout principles
     7.3  Motion Economy Check List; discussion of 20 Principles

8.0  Ergonomics (Human Factors)
     8.1  Definition
     8.2  Scope and history
     8.3  Anthropometry
     8.4  Discussion of body dimensions
     8.5  Workplace design dimensions
     8.6  NIOSH guidelines for manual lifting
     8.7  Hand tool design

9.0  Work Measurement
     9.1  Overview of work measurement concepts
     9.2  The Standard Hour Concept
     9.3  Time study
          9.3.1  Stopwatches
          9.3.2  Procedure
          9.3.3  Work description
          9.3.4  Elemental breakdown
          9.3.5  Types of method description
          9.3.6  Keywords, breakpoints
          9.3.7  Irregular elements, foreign elements
          9.3.8  Number of cycles to study
     9.4  Evaluating operator performance
          9.4.1  Definition
          9.4.2  Characteristics of normal performance
          9.4.3  Performance descriptors; skill, effort, pace, etc.
          9.4.4  Benchmarks
          9.4.5  Performance rating systems
          9.4.6  Selection of an average operator
     9.5  Recording the data
           9.5.1  Snapback vs. continuous study
     9.6  Time study exercises

10.0 Work Sampling
     10.1 Introductory Video
     10.2 Work Sampling Procedure
          10.2.1 Statistical principles, randomness
          10.2.2 Demonstration
          10.2.3 Determination of sample size; alignment chart
          10.2.4 Design of study elements
          10.2.5 Taking the study; instantaneous observation
          10.2.6 Tracking progress of the study
     10.3 Work Measurement Sampling
     10.4 Use of an electronic random reminder; time management

11.0 Line Balancing
     11.1 Discussion--Use of powered lines
     11.2 Factors influencing product assembly; design, equipment, precedence
     11.3 Build methods; process or product orientation, fixed position
     11.4 Line types; straight, circular, indexing or continuous
     11.5 Requirements for the line balancing process
     11.6 Line balancing procedure
     11.7 Line balance-powered line operations
     11.8 Line balance class problem (team exercise)

12.0 Summary and Critique
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Industrial Engineering Techniques for Improving Operations
McGraw Hill Book Co, June 1986

Operation Analysis by Maynard, 1939

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Industrial Engineering Skills


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HONG KONG IGDS MODULE OUTLINE
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING FOR BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT
INTRODUCTION:
This course module provides an introduction to Industrial Engineering techniques as used to measure and improve productivity, and defines the role of I.E. data in a company's planning and costing systems.
OBJECTIVES:
On completion, participants will be capable of:
(1)
Understanding the role of Industrial Engineering in productivity improvement.
(2)
Using I.E. techniques in simple applications for manpower and capacity planning.
(3)
Understanding the social context of industrial engineering.
(4)
Directing the industrial engineering activity to achieve business objectives.
CONTENTS:
  1. Industrial Engineering and Productivity Measurement
  2. Problem solving in Industrial Engineering
  3. Method Study
  4. Work Measurement
  5. Layout Planning
  6. Control of staff and production indirects
  7. Ergonomics
  8. Job Design
  9. Human Relations
  10. Manpower and capacity planning
DURATION: 40 hours
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http://www.uta.edu/gradcatalog/2004/ie
IE 5191. ADVANCED STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Individually approved research projects and reading courses in industrial engineering. Such individual studies will be graded A, B, C, D, F or X. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, IE 5191, 5291 and 5391 may be repeated as the topics change. In addition, work on a thesis substitute will be performed under IE 5391. In this case, IE 5391 is graded P/F/R.
Prerequisite: written approval of both the supervising faculty member and Graduate Advisor.
IE 5291. ADVANCED STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Individually approved research projects and reading courses in industrial engineering. Such individual studies will be graded A, B, C, D, F or X. Subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, IE 5191, 5291 and 5391 may be repeated as the topics change. In addition, work on a thesis substitute will be performed under IE 5391. In this case, IE 5391 is graded P/F/R.
Prerequisite: written approval of both the supervising faculty member and Graduate Advisor.
IE 5300. TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (3-0)
A study of selected topics in industrial engineering. May be repeated when topics vary.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

IE 5338. HUMAN ENGINEERING (3-0)
Human structural, physiological, psychological, and cognitive capacities and limitations in the workplace, and their effects on the design of work systems to enhance productivity, and maintain health and safety.
Prerequisite: IE 3301 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

IE 5350. GRADUATE DESIGN CAPSTONE (3-0)
Practicum in Industrial Engineering techniques consisting of professional level experience in a relevant company, agency, or institution. This technical experience is directed by a supervising professor and requires the writing of a professional report.
Prerequisite: 24 hours of graduate work in Industrial Engineering.

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Management of Engineering Design Office Operations through Utilisation of Computer Systems and Application of Industrial Engineering Techniques


Mitchell, RM; Hing, CR; Bashford, KH
Abstract: The paper describes a project undertaken with the aim of improving management of an Engineering Design Office. Dealt with are the application of industrial engineering techniques to develop performance standards and procedures for their use, development of a supporting computer system, and education of engineering managers to facilitate implementation and maintenance of new systems.
Conference on Engineering Management 1981

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